book promotion, Magic and Science, mythology, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

Gods Of Clay

Who would have thought that a homeless girl living on the streets could be a God? Not Porter, son of a wealthy banker. Nor would he ever consider becoming her consort!
– “She’s Probably God,” Gods Of Clay, GD Deckard

Anthologies seem to be a popular way for authors to become better known.
Do you have a story in an anthology? Use the Comments section to tell us about it.

(Gods Of Clay details: https://www.amazon.com/Gods-Clay-Sci-Roundtable-Anthology-ebook/dp/B07N7TFVK7)

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7 thoughts on “Gods Of Clay

  1. victoracquista says:

    Thanks for promoting anthologies GD. I enjoyed reading your story in “Gods of Clay”. My story in this same collection represents the third anthology I have a short story published within. I do think it’s a good way to introduce readers to your writing; although, I’m not sure how well a short story captures my writing style. I find writing a short story requires a different approach than writing a novel. Not much room for subplots and even character development in a short story, so I try to strip away some of the “extras” that I enjoy incorporating into a novel. Speaking metaphorically, I enjoy cooking. A novel is much like a full course meal. Preparing a meal gives me a chance to prepare and combine different dishes and taste sensations into a multifaceted and hopefully enjoyable experience. Writing a short story is more like preparing a nice appetizer or a fancy dessert.

    I’ve clipped below a taste of, “The Place Where Kartus ‘Sil Slumbers”.

    “Kartun, why must we leave? We are simply here trying to learn what happened to the ancient Sentans who came before you, the race that disappeared.”
    After listening to a lengthy alien sing-song, the translator interpreted the response. “He says you must not wake up Kartus ‘Sil. You are in danger. We already know what happened to the ancients. We do not need you to dig and explore to tell us what we already know.”
    “Ask him again what happened.”
    The scholar-priest looked annoyed, as if he had to explain the same thing again and again to children who were not listening.
    Gustav translated, “They woke the sleeping god. He devoured them. I have told you this.” Kartun pointed to the native who formally assisted at the excavation site. “Myyrlassina told you this. Are you stupid? Do you all wish to die?”

    Liked by 3 people

    • GD Deckard says:

      Good points, Victor. I’ve read 25 short stories over the last week in an initial screening of submissions to our 2019 The Rabbit Hole anthology and what you say is right on. To me, short stories & novels require a different frame of mind.

      Liked by 3 people

  2. To date, I have four short stories in anthologies, one acquired for use in an interactive story app, and have written several others to submit to various contests and publications. I think the effort is helping me learn more about the craft. I agree short stories and novels come from different frames of mind, but it doesn’t seem any easier to me to write a short story than it is to write a novel — it just takes less time. Advantage: short story. The same challenges exist in both forms — plot, interesting characters with individual voices, moving the story forward without resorting to exposition dumps. . .

    So far, I’ve read GD’s “She’s Probably a God” in the SciFi Roundtable Anthology — fun bit of absurdity in a twist on the “superior race” theme.

    Liked by 2 people

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