About Writers, blogging, book promotion, inspiration, Stories, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

True Gamer Anthology – Stories by Gamers for Gamers

An untapped market of $152,000,000,000 (that’s billions of dollars) a year with over two billion active participants? Maybe. I suspect most writers are unaware of it.

Games today require an immersive story line. Howard Hughes is featured in Fallout New Vegas. Apparently, Howard survived the nuclear war as a human-robot hybrid living deep underground in a vat of biomedical brew. He controls the city, not for money, but because he wants power over others so he can create a post-apocalyptic world in his own image.

The average video game writer salary is $82,935.
https://www.quora.com/How-much-do-video-game-scriptwriters-make-in-a-big-company
(Forget Fan-fiction, except for fun. Logically enough, it is difficult to make money based on something someone else has created and copyrighted.)

Voice actor dialogue is first-rate. Linda Carter – yep, Wonder Woman – wrote and sang the songs for her own in-game character. Magnolia, the sultry lounge singer in Fallout 4 sings good jazz, too. Google her sometime:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S39BnYdGD6Q

We are beginning to plan an anthology of true gamer stories. You are invited to join us. Imagine, real stories that happened in fantasy. We think some of those two billion gamers will want to read it. Only the game gods know what we will find. Love stories, of course. And death. I once played with a drug enforcement agent who came online one day and just wanted to be with “friends.” She was quite upset. She had had to shoot someone in real life. In-game is where she went for consolation. Expect extremes. I remember a lady from the earliest days of online gaming who logged into the game from the maternity ward. She wanted everyone to meet her new baby. That was -truly 😃 – memorable role play as we sat at our keyboards around the world, grinning and being happy for the mother. Expect delight.

To produce an anthology of true gamer stories we will need agents to explore the game forums and find true stories, writers who are also gamers to write their own stories, ghostwriters for players who are not writers, editors of course, and a publisher to format the story and put it on Amazon in time for next Christmas season. You may be any one or more of these and how this effort is organized is up to the people doing the work. Those who are still here this time next year will be the agents, writers, editors and publisher of what can be a ground breaking effort.

Join us. Go to the Facebook Group, “True Game Stories.”
Or email me, GD<at>Deckard<dot>com.

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About Writers, blogging, book promotion, Stories, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

The PC Censor

Does political correctness censor your writing? I ask because I woke this morning with the realization that my WiP is purely politically incorrect. Badly so in parts. I thought about dropping the project until, fully awake, I remembered that everything I’ve written is fact, not opinion. It is not fiction based on my experiences as a medic during the Vietnam War, it is a telling of those experiences.

Every writer worth more than their sales knows that truth, however one defines it, is beholden to fact but not to the expectations of public opinion. I have to wonder though, to what extent my writing is influenced by wanting people to like it, to not offend others by a truth that I define.

The nature of the beast is the problem. War is not easily described to people with preconceived notions about how good people should behave towards other good people. Young men and women see the world differently from the way they learned to see it when they are serving in a war hospital eleven thousand miles from home. Perception overwhelms upbringing. The daily smells of blood and iodine disinfectant around open gunshot wounds in dying men cannot be processed the same way as feelings hurt by an offensive remark.

Words, as used here and now, are not meant to convey the reality of there and then. The words of war (hmm, I’ll have to make that a chapter title) are determined by the exhaustion of compassion, the need to wall off the horror, and to cling to a useful sanity in an insane world. Acceptance of reality is required to save lives. The death rate of wounded soldiers in Vietnam was 1.9% because the men and women involved coped with reality.

How they coped is my story. This WiP sat in my mind for years while I searched for words that don’t exist. When I began, I found myself writing from the point of view of the people involved, and with no regard to how that might affect today’s reader wrapped in a comfort blanket of moral smugness. Having thought it through, (thanks for reading this) I’m determined to continue. The soldiers understood that death requires forgiveness. I am not going to apologize for their stories.

+++“I was taking a guy to x-ray in a wheelchair. Shot-up, just off a medivac. We go by the gift shop and he says, ‘Stop! See that nurse? I want to eyeball-fuck her.’ I stopped.” He shrugged.
+++“Who was she?” Captain Kelly asked with humor in her eyes.
+++“Jenkins, from O.B.”
+++“Oh. That didn’t take him long then.” She turned serious. “I understand. You see death, you want life.” Sucking in a breath, she pushed her chair from the table and stood. “Back to it.” He took in the redhead walking away. Kelly was on the dialysis team and regularly watched young men die because their kidneys had been left on the battlefield. When she was on call at night, Captain Kelly was notified by waking the doctor on call that night.
+++– from Code Blue and Little Deaths

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book promotion, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

Welcome to The Rabbit Hole!

The Anthology cover has been revealed and here it is.

This cover has been designed to stand out on a screen. It is unlike traditional book covers that are viewed by the light that bounces off of them. This one has been designed as a true electronic cover that is viewed in the glow of light coming through the image. The Rabbit Hole cover will pop out on web pages that list books for sale.

This stand-out image was created by cover artist – and author and musician – Ian C. Bristow. His works can be viewed, read and listened to, here:

https://www.DeviantArt.com/brokeman29
http://IancBristow.com/
https://SoundCloud.com/anristow

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blogging, inspiration, Research, Stories, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

Story Fodder (Writers Musings)

How will we identify criminal A.I.? It is all programming and easily changeable. “Nope. I never even thought that. Nothing to see here.”

Cell phones record your fingerprints. That is a positive ID across platforms. Does the NSA capture our fingerprints from our phones?

Voices. “I wonder what they’re saying when I’m sleeping?”

When we awaken, the real world floods in and the world of dreams fade. Just like the real world fades when we dream. Could both worlds be real?

Unreasonable urges: “I must teach my cat to play the piano.”

During the Roman Empire, the Palace Guard often chose the next emperor. Recent reports suggest that our intelligent intelligence community interferes in our presidential elections. Hmmm.

My neighbor just informed me that the Soviet Union beat the US to the Moon… but their cosmonauts never got home.

I read the news again today, oh boy. China’s launching robotic military submarines. Imagine that A.I. going rogue.
Drudge Report links to an article about “Mysterious creatures frozen for MILLENNIA holding lost secrets of past…”
The UK Daily Star headlines, “Sex robot human CLONES: Chinese firm using 3D printers to scan and make replicas of REAL PEOPLE.”
Newspapers print these articles as bait. They know many many people will read them.
The market for such stories already exists.
Hmmm.

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About Writers, book promotion, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op, Writers Co-op Anthology

Ian Bristow

Meet novelist and cover artist Ian C. Bristow. Ian is creating the cover illustration for The Rabbit Hole, Weird Stories Volume One, A Writers’ Co-op Production.

He is also creating the cover for the anthology, Gods Of Clay, coming out later this year. Ian’s own published works include the Conner’s Odyssey series and Hunting Darkness (The trailer that he created for this book can be seen here.)
Some of his art can be viewed on his own website gallery and on Deviant Art.

Ian Bristow2CAPTURING IMAGINATION
Ian C. Bristow

The Writers Co-op exists as a forum where members of the writing community can meet, promote their work and help one another. We welcome Ian Bristow.

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book promotion, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

The Writers Co-op: 2018 Liebster Blog Award Nominee

Liebster2The Writers Co-op has been nominated for the 2018 Leibster Blog Award.
The Liebster Award is an award that is given to bloggers by other bloggers. We were nominated by former Liebster winner, novelist Stephanie Barr.
Entries start 1st Jan 2018 and end on 25th Dec 2018. The winner will be picked on the 31st of December. (This year, the prize will be a BioLite Camp Stove worth £150.)

As a member of the Co-op, you may submit your individual blog according to the rules outlined below.

Liebster3
What to Do if Nominated for the Liebster Award

Source: https://theglobalaussie.com/liebster-award-2018/
Back in 2011 the rules were a simple case of acknowledgement of the nominator and to nominate 5 more. Now in 2018 it is a little more involved and will continue to evolve as blogging becomes more accessible.

If you have been nominated for The Liebster Award AND YOU CHOOSE TO ACCEPT IT, you should do the following:
1. Thank the person who nominated you, and put a link to their blog on your blog. Try to include a little promotion for the person who nominated you. They will thank you for it and those who you nominate will also help you out as well.
2. Display the award on your blog — by including it in your post and/or displaying it using a “widget” or a “gadget”. (Note that the best way to do this is to save the image to your own computer and then upload it to your blog post.)
3. For the 2018 Liebster Award, I will be shaking things up! Write a small post about what makes you passionate about blog posting.
4. Provide 10 random facts about yourself. (Again this year I’m making this optional. If you wish to engage with your readers it’s a great idea to include random facts about you.)
5. Nominate 5 – 11 blogs that you feel would enjoy blogging about this award.
6. List these rules in your post (You can copy and paste from here or simply link to this post.) Once you have written and published it, you then have to:
7. Inform the people/blogs that you nominated that they have been nominated for the Liebster award and provide a link for them to your post or mine if you don’t have all the information so that they can learn about it (they might not have ever heard of it! Post a comment in the comments below so I can view your post and check out your blog. I personally visit each and every one. I visited a few hundred last year!!

If you have been nominated before at any time please share the love. Many people believe the Liebster award is similar to a chain email/letter and sure it shares similarities but the underlining idea is to help promote each others’ blogs.

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About Writers, book promotion, book sales, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

$67,000 In Three Months

Adam Nicholls, Author
Posted on Facebook 13 Jun 18 at 5:16am / 20BooksTo50K
$67,300.88 earned between March 2018 and June 2018

I’ve been in two minds about doing this because it feels too much like bragging, but I was finally persuaded to suck it up and write this on the off chance that it might help someone. Please note, this is from an 8-book rapid release. With that out the way, here are some tips that you may or may not know already (and bear in mind this isn’t gospel – it’s just what I did):

– Use K-lytics to find a hot genre and then dig in deeper to find that niche. When you find something that interests you, hit the top 20 chart and read like it’ll get you out of jail. You need to learn those tropes and give readers what they expect when they buy your book.

– Write. Don’t make excuses, but don’t beat yourself up if you can’t do it 24/7. This is hard work for some people (myself included), but remember that in order to sell a product you must first create that product.

– Get a cover that fits the genre. A great cover can be a useless cover if it doesn’t fit the tropes. Again, check out the top 20 to look for common themes. At the end of the day you’re looking to recreate what’s currently selling, so why stray from the path?

– A decent editor is absolutely vital, and a good proofreader is, too. There are plenty here in the threads, and most come as recommendations rather than just self-promotion.

– Mailing lists are another commonly discussed topic. I use Mailerlite and I love it. You can use Instafreebie and Bookfunnel to build that list, as well as running Facebook ads (more on this below). What changed things for me? I started sending out an email every Monday, and I don’t keep trying to push sales. I talk about my dog, what I’m reading, and where I’ve been this week. Readers enjoy this. They email back, and you should, too. Be more than an author – be a friend. This part hurts to say because it feels like I’m betraying them, but those readers/friends are now guaranteed sales on release day.

– Rapid release. If you can, save up four or more books and then release one weekly. I don’t know too much on the science of this one, but Martha Carr has a great video on it, so search the files.

– KDP Rocket. Is it a must? It was for me. I personally only used it for my seven Amazon keywords, but it’s worth every penny spent. Others use it for Amazon ads, which I’m yet to explore.

– Network. Make friends. The more people you know, the more you can learn from each other. It could be that everything you needed to know was obvious to someone else, so communicate and be helpful. Which brings me to…

– Pay it forward. To put it bluntly, I was an introvert writer making no money. Since I started helping people out and doing favours (yes, even to those who were clearly using me) I’ve become an introvert writer who’s making lots of money. It pays to not be a total dick most of the time (it turns out my mother was right). I’ve learned so much from the people here, and giving some back is good karma, if nothing else.

– It never hurts to collaborate. I recently completed a book with another 20books author and it was a HUGE success. You split the work, you share the profits, and you find new readers in each other’s lists. Use this to your advantage and help each other out (by the by, I’m always looking for thriller authors to work with, so drop me a message if you’re interested).

– Advertising can be a chore, but I stick to the basics: Bargain Booksy, ENT Reader, Robin Reads, and Facebook ads. A quick Google search will give you the first three, and Mark Dawson’s Facebook course is a fountain of knowledge that can’t be ignored. Set yourself a budget and work at it. It took me 2 years to learn this stuff, but here I am.

– Most of all – and this is by far the most important thing – ENJOY IT. A love of writing doesn’t have to become a daily slog. Get up in the morning and put some words on the page. Open your email and talk to other writers. Communicate with your readers. Host competitions and look for places to get interviewed. You have one of the most interesting jobs in the world (especially if you moonlight as a Playboy photographer), so get out there and have fun with it!

Any questions? Ask away. I’ll do what I can to answer them, although I’m having a bit of a busy day so please forgive me if I don’t respond immediately.

Adam Nicholls, an urban fantasy author from the south-west of England, has been creating stories since before he could legally drink. Inspired by the works of Stephen King, Karin Slaughter and Gillian Flynn, Adam starts writing each new book by asking himself how best to shock his readers.

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