Legal, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

The Author’s Lawyer

Lawyers, like doctors, are best avoided in their professional capacity but sometimes, even purveyors of the immortal word benefit from specific legal advice. If you think you might need it,  remember that the initial consultation is usually free of any cost or commitment on your part.

Do I Really Need a Literary Attorney?
Yes, I would say, anytime the potential rewards are high, you may want someone on your side who understands how best to protect your interests. Here’s Arielle Ford’s brief explanation in the Huffington Post:
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/arielle-ford/do-i-really-need-a-litera_b_927120.html

5 Top Legal Issues for Authors and Self-Publishers.
legalSara Hawkins points out some reasons why today’s authors do seek legal advice, including the current buggery-boo of “What if it’s your work that’s taken?”
https://www.thebookdesigner.com/2013/03/5-top-legal-issues/

FAQs: Working With A Literary Lawyer.
OKAY, just what is a literary lawyer? This short article by Laura Resnick covers “what, why & how do I find one.” Something to be aware of, just in case, someday, you want to Google it.
http://www.lauraresnick.com/writers-resources/faqs-working-with-a-literary-lawyer/

YaY!
Think positive. You just landed a movie contract for your book! Now, you do want an attorney, a literary attorney, someone who has the expertise and experience to protect you and to help you to get the most from this lifetime deal. How do you find one? Why, at Lawyers.com, of course.
https://www.lawyers.com/

A little knowledge about literary attorneys is worth filing away. Tuck it right next to the possibility that one day, your writing will be worth more than any attorney costs 🙂

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blogging, inspiration, Research, Stories, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

Story Fodder (Writers Musings)

How will we identify criminal A.I.? It is all programming and easily changeable. “Nope. I never even thought that. Nothing to see here.”

Cell phones record your fingerprints. That is a positive ID across platforms. Does the NSA capture our fingerprints from our phones?

Voices. “I wonder what they’re saying when I’m sleeping?”

When we awaken, the real world floods in and the world of dreams fade. Just like the real world fades when we dream. Could both worlds be real?

Unreasonable urges: “I must teach my cat to play the piano.”

During the Roman Empire, the Palace Guard often chose the next emperor. Recent reports suggest that our intelligent intelligence community interferes in our presidential elections. Hmmm.

My neighbor just informed me that the Soviet Union beat the US to the Moon… but their cosmonauts never got home.

I read the news again today, oh boy. China’s launching robotic military submarines. Imagine that A.I. going rogue.
Drudge Report links to an article about “Mysterious creatures frozen for MILLENNIA holding lost secrets of past…”
The UK Daily Star headlines, “Sex robot human CLONES: Chinese firm using 3D printers to scan and make replicas of REAL PEOPLE.”
Newspapers print these articles as bait. They know many many people will read them.
The market for such stories already exists.
Hmmm.

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About Writers, book promotion, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op, Writers Co-op Anthology

Ian Bristow

Meet novelist and cover artist Ian C. Bristow. Ian is creating the cover illustration for The Rabbit Hole, Weird Stories Volume One, A Writers’ Co-op Production.

He is also creating the cover for the anthology, Gods Of Clay, coming out later this year. Ian’s own published works include the Conner’s Odyssey series and Hunting Darkness (The trailer that he created for this book can be seen here.)
Some of his art can be viewed on his own website gallery and on Deviant Art.

Ian Bristow2CAPTURING IMAGINATION
Ian C. Bristow

The Writers Co-op exists as a forum where members of the writing community can meet, promote their work and help one another. We welcome Ian Bristow.

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book promotion, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

The Writers Co-op: 2018 Liebster Blog Award Nominee

Liebster2The Writers Co-op has been nominated for the 2018 Leibster Blog Award.
The Liebster Award is an award that is given to bloggers by other bloggers. We were nominated by former Liebster winner, novelist Stephanie Barr.
Entries start 1st Jan 2018 and end on 25th Dec 2018. The winner will be picked on the 31st of December. (This year, the prize will be a BioLite Camp Stove worth £150.)

As a member of the Co-op, you may submit your individual blog according to the rules outlined below.

Liebster3
What to Do if Nominated for the Liebster Award

Source: https://theglobalaussie.com/liebster-award-2018/
Back in 2011 the rules were a simple case of acknowledgement of the nominator and to nominate 5 more. Now in 2018 it is a little more involved and will continue to evolve as blogging becomes more accessible.

If you have been nominated for The Liebster Award AND YOU CHOOSE TO ACCEPT IT, you should do the following:
1. Thank the person who nominated you, and put a link to their blog on your blog. Try to include a little promotion for the person who nominated you. They will thank you for it and those who you nominate will also help you out as well.
2. Display the award on your blog — by including it in your post and/or displaying it using a “widget” or a “gadget”. (Note that the best way to do this is to save the image to your own computer and then upload it to your blog post.)
3. For the 2018 Liebster Award, I will be shaking things up! Write a small post about what makes you passionate about blog posting.
4. Provide 10 random facts about yourself. (Again this year I’m making this optional. If you wish to engage with your readers it’s a great idea to include random facts about you.)
5. Nominate 5 – 11 blogs that you feel would enjoy blogging about this award.
6. List these rules in your post (You can copy and paste from here or simply link to this post.) Once you have written and published it, you then have to:
7. Inform the people/blogs that you nominated that they have been nominated for the Liebster award and provide a link for them to your post or mine if you don’t have all the information so that they can learn about it (they might not have ever heard of it! Post a comment in the comments below so I can view your post and check out your blog. I personally visit each and every one. I visited a few hundred last year!!

If you have been nominated before at any time please share the love. Many people believe the Liebster award is similar to a chain email/letter and sure it shares similarities but the underlining idea is to help promote each others’ blogs.

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About Writers, book promotion, book sales, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

$67,000 In Three Months

Adam Nicholls, Author
Posted on Facebook 13 Jun 18 at 5:16am / 20BooksTo50K
$67,300.88 earned between March 2018 and June 2018

I’ve been in two minds about doing this because it feels too much like bragging, but I was finally persuaded to suck it up and write this on the off chance that it might help someone. Please note, this is from an 8-book rapid release. With that out the way, here are some tips that you may or may not know already (and bear in mind this isn’t gospel – it’s just what I did):

– Use K-lytics to find a hot genre and then dig in deeper to find that niche. When you find something that interests you, hit the top 20 chart and read like it’ll get you out of jail. You need to learn those tropes and give readers what they expect when they buy your book.

– Write. Don’t make excuses, but don’t beat yourself up if you can’t do it 24/7. This is hard work for some people (myself included), but remember that in order to sell a product you must first create that product.

– Get a cover that fits the genre. A great cover can be a useless cover if it doesn’t fit the tropes. Again, check out the top 20 to look for common themes. At the end of the day you’re looking to recreate what’s currently selling, so why stray from the path?

– A decent editor is absolutely vital, and a good proofreader is, too. There are plenty here in the threads, and most come as recommendations rather than just self-promotion.

– Mailing lists are another commonly discussed topic. I use Mailerlite and I love it. You can use Instafreebie and Bookfunnel to build that list, as well as running Facebook ads (more on this below). What changed things for me? I started sending out an email every Monday, and I don’t keep trying to push sales. I talk about my dog, what I’m reading, and where I’ve been this week. Readers enjoy this. They email back, and you should, too. Be more than an author – be a friend. This part hurts to say because it feels like I’m betraying them, but those readers/friends are now guaranteed sales on release day.

– Rapid release. If you can, save up four or more books and then release one weekly. I don’t know too much on the science of this one, but Martha Carr has a great video on it, so search the files.

– KDP Rocket. Is it a must? It was for me. I personally only used it for my seven Amazon keywords, but it’s worth every penny spent. Others use it for Amazon ads, which I’m yet to explore.

– Network. Make friends. The more people you know, the more you can learn from each other. It could be that everything you needed to know was obvious to someone else, so communicate and be helpful. Which brings me to…

– Pay it forward. To put it bluntly, I was an introvert writer making no money. Since I started helping people out and doing favours (yes, even to those who were clearly using me) I’ve become an introvert writer who’s making lots of money. It pays to not be a total dick most of the time (it turns out my mother was right). I’ve learned so much from the people here, and giving some back is good karma, if nothing else.

– It never hurts to collaborate. I recently completed a book with another 20books author and it was a HUGE success. You split the work, you share the profits, and you find new readers in each other’s lists. Use this to your advantage and help each other out (by the by, I’m always looking for thriller authors to work with, so drop me a message if you’re interested).

– Advertising can be a chore, but I stick to the basics: Bargain Booksy, ENT Reader, Robin Reads, and Facebook ads. A quick Google search will give you the first three, and Mark Dawson’s Facebook course is a fountain of knowledge that can’t be ignored. Set yourself a budget and work at it. It took me 2 years to learn this stuff, but here I am.

– Most of all – and this is by far the most important thing – ENJOY IT. A love of writing doesn’t have to become a daily slog. Get up in the morning and put some words on the page. Open your email and talk to other writers. Communicate with your readers. Host competitions and look for places to get interviewed. You have one of the most interesting jobs in the world (especially if you moonlight as a Playboy photographer), so get out there and have fun with it!

Any questions? Ask away. I’ll do what I can to answer them, although I’m having a bit of a busy day so please forgive me if I don’t respond immediately.

Adam Nicholls, an urban fantasy author from the south-west of England, has been creating stories since before he could legally drink. Inspired by the works of Stephen King, Karin Slaughter and Gillian Flynn, Adam starts writing each new book by asking himself how best to shock his readers.

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About Writers, book promotion, book sales, Research, self-publishing, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

Kindle Unlimited

That is, is it worth it to the Author?
Kindle Unlimited (KU) is a subscription service. With Kindle Unlimited, customers can read as many books as they like and keep them as long as they want for a monthly subscription fee.

Author Jon Cronshaw recently asked the question, “Is there anything (beyond the usual wide versus KU debate) that makes wide or KU better?

Author Brian Meeks responded, “That’s a really good question. I’m not sure I can speak to your genre, but I do have some thoughts.

Over the last six months, I’ve noticed something. The conversions I track across all 5 genres in which I write, have changed. It used to be about 50% sales and 50% KU downloads. That’s not the case anymore. The shift has been toward KU.

My data shows 40% sales and 60% KU downloads. This tells me that more people are joining KU and enjoying it like we all do with Netflix. It also makes me think the shift will continue.

There’s one other point that often doesn’t get mentioned. It’s that the MOST voracious readers, naturally, gravitate toward KU.

I hope these thoughts will help you a bit. Good luck.”

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About Writers, inspiration, publishing, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op, writing technique

Insights

Secrets of Bestselling Authors

INSPIRATION & IDEAS
“Good writing is remembering detail. Most people want to forget. Don’t forget things that were painful or embarrassing or silly. Turn them into a story that tells the truth.”
– Paula Danziger

GETTING STARTED
“Two questions form the foundation of all novels: ‘What if?’ and ‘What next?’ (A third question, ‘What now?’, is one the author asks himself every 10 minutes or so; but it’s more a cry than a question.) Every novel begins with the speculative question, What if ‘X’ happened? That’s how you start.”
– Tom Clancy

STYLE & CRAFT
“What a writer has to do is write what hasn’t been written before or beat dead men at what they have done.”
– Ernest Hemingway

PURPOSE
“The only obligation any artist can have is to himself. His work means nothing, otherwise. It has no meaning.”
– Truman Capote

CHARACTERS
“The writer must always leave room for the characters to grow and change. If you move your characters from plot point to plot point, like painting by the numbers, they often remain stick figures. They will never take on a life of their own. The most exciting thing is when you find a character doing something surprising or unplanned. Like a character saying to me: ‘Hey, Richard, you may think I work for you, but I don’t. I’m my own person.’”
– Richard North Patterson

PLOT & STRUCTURE
“The problem for me is finding my own plots. They take a long time. … I like to have it happen, just like in our own lives. We don’t always know where they’re going, and if we make formal decisions on a given night, if we sit down and put a list of things we’re going to do on a piece of paper, they almost never work out right.”
– Norman Mailer

RITUALS & METHODS
“The conclusion to be drawn is that I am happiest writing in small rooms. They make me feel comfortable and secure. And it took me years to figure out that I need to write in a corner. Like a small animal burrowing into its hole, I shift furniture around, and back myself into a cozy corner, with my back to the wall … and then I can write.”
– Danielle Steel

REVISION & EDITING
“I do not rewrite unless I am absolutely sure that I can express the material better if I do rewrite it.”
– William Faulkner

PUBLISHING
“Publishers want to take chances on books that will draw a clamor and some legitimate publicity. They want to publish controversial books. That their reasons are mercenary and yours may be lofty should not deter you.”
– Harlan Ellison

READERS
“In truth, I never consider the audience for whom I’m writing. I just write what I want to write.”
– J.K. Rowling

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