About Writers, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

Sharing some thoughts and experiences about the Authors Guild

By Victor Acquista

Liz BNo,  it isn’t: “a medieval association of craftsmen or merchants, often having considerable power” (although, that would be pretty cool), but it is: “an association of people for mutual aid or the pursuit of a common goal”.

I mentioned the Authors Guild in a previous comment and GD suggested I provide some information. I never really thought too much about it, but there is something medieval sounding about joining and being part of a guild. I assure you, the AG is very up to date on what is going on in the world of writing and publishing and can be a very solid resource to support writers professionally. This will primarily be a cut and paste post with information from their website: https://www.authorsguild.org/

Our mission is to support working writers. We advocate for the rights of writers by supporting free speech, fair contracts, and copyright. We create community and we fight for a living wage.

WHO WE ARE

The Authors Guild is the nation’s oldest and largest professional organization for writers. Since its beginnings over a century ago, we have served as the collective voice of American authors.

Our members include novelists, historians, journalists, and poets—traditionally and independently published—as well as literary agents and representatives of writers’ estates.

The Guild advocates for authors on issues of copyright, fair contracts, free speech and tax fairness, and has initiated lawsuits in defense of authors’ rights, where necessary. We represent authors on the Hill, in state legislatures, and in government agencies. And we work to establish fair royalty rates for both e-books and print books.

Our members have access to a broad range of legal and web services. The Guild’s legal staff reviews members’ book and freelance contracts and intervenes in publishing disputes. We provide liability insurance at group rates, a Back-in-Print program, and a free subscription to our quarterly Bulletin, as well as host and help develop members’ websites. Our new, re-designed website includes a more robust member directory (searchable by numerous categories), an events calendar, daily and weekly news updates, digital archives of the Bulletin and recorded seminars. We also hold in-person and phone-in seminars and symposia on issues critical to the writing life, and more informal gatherings throughout the country.

Information about membership can be found here: https://www.authorsguild.org/join/

Here are some of the salient details:

WHO CAN JOIN?

  • Traditionally published authors
  • Self-published authors
  • Poets
  • Translators
  • Ghostwriters
  • Illustrators
  • Freelance writers
  • Writers who’ve received a contract offer
  • Writers working on a manuscript
  • College & Grad Students
  • Literary Agents
  • Editors
  • Attorneys
  • Estates/Heirs

Regular Membership: Traditionally published authors with at least 1 published book in the U.S.; self-published authors who have made at least $5,000 in the past 18 months from their writing; and freelance writers who have published 3+ pieces or made $5,000 in the past 18 months.

Associate Membership: Writers who have received a contract offer from a traditional U.S. publisher or an offer of representation from a U.S. literary agent; self-published authors or freelance writers who have made at least $500 in the past 18 months from their writing.

There are other membership categories including for students and emerging writers. Standard dues are $125 annually.

I have personally met the Executive Director, Mary Rasenberger, when she hosted a meeting for Guild members in the Santa Fe, New Mexico area. She traveled to selected places throughout the country to talk about the Guild, some of the current issues facing authors, what’s happening with lobbying efforts to advocate for authors, boost membership, and a host of other issues. I found the presentation to be excellent and it provided a wonderful opportunity to meet other authors and hear about their experiences and concerns.

I have participated in writing groups, attended conferences and workshops, and generally been involved with a number of professional activities related to writing. As an organization, I feel as though the Guild is working on my behalf to advocate for authors and to be a resource. This type of involvement is quite different from the other professional activities that I just mentioned. I found my publicist through the Guild’s resource network and felt confidant that the Guild would not recommend a shoddy company. I have used the Guild’s legal services on two different occasions. I worked with the Guild in notifying them about a problem with Kindle royalties not posting correctly after I learned from Amazon that the problem involved multiple authors. Although Amazon did correct the royalty issue, I know the AG got involved. I have also used their resource library a number of times.

I could probably go on, but if you aren’t interested enough to poke around their website to learn more from what I’ve shared thus far, the Authors Guild probably is not your cup of tea. As you can tell, I think they are a fine organization. Final comment—I always include the fact that I am a member of the AG in my query letters. I don’t know if it helps or not, but in my mind it conveys something positive.

 

 

Advertisements
Standard