About Writers, blogging, inspiration, Research, Stories, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op, writing technique

Steep and Roll

songwriting 2This is a concept that I am gradually beginning to understand how to use. A friend once critiqued my first novel with:

“There’s so much great stuff in there it needs to slow its roll and steep a little, meaning take longer to explain things and have a nice build up.”
– Chris Gabriel, song writer

Chris explained it as a technique that professional song writers use. It made me wonder how many other song writing techniques could apply to story writing. So, I researched song writing advice and found dozens of tips. Here’s the top 6.

1. Practice. Like any other creative process such as playing guitar or programming synth sounds, lyric-writing is a skill that can be learnt and improved upon.

2. Don’t be disheartened if your lyrics aren’t perfect on the first draft. Many professional writers will rewrite a song’s lyrics dozens of times before they make it onto record.

3. Persevere. More often than not, songs aren’t born, they’re created and sculpted. Don’t expect a song to arrive fully formed; they sometimes take time and you’ll need to work at it.

4. If you can’t quite figure out how to say what you want within a particular line, jot down the gist of it and move on to another part of the song – you can come back to it later. That way, you won’t spend hours wrestling with one small line that might turn out to be insignificant in the wider context of the song.

5. Try to have a clear idea of what the song is about. You should be able to sum up the essence of the song in one sentence.

6. Analyze other songs. Try to pick out the differences in lyrics between your favorite songs and your own and apply any lyrical techniques you learn to your own work.

I think we story writers can learn a lot from song writers. Oh and, if anyone has insight into “Steep and Roll,” please post it in the comments?

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About Writers, Amazon, book promotion, book reviews, book sales, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

Speak Now Or ….

Peer reviewWHAT
After discussion, the group has decided to add Peer Reviews. Peer Reviews are book reviews written by the author’s peers: other authors, editors, publishers and professional members of the writing community at large.

HOW
Writers Co-op would allow authors to post reviews and link to the book’s sale page. We’d just set up the page(s) and grant the authors’ permission to post there.
Atthys Gage has agreed to monitor the reviews.

WHEN
Next week, at the earliest, I could set up a prototype page to see how it goes.

WILL IT WORK
“Who knows?” said the first person over Niagara Falls in a barrel. One thing of which we can be certain is a learning curve. The hardest part will probably be the startup. I’ll start with what I can do based on my best understanding of the peer review discussions, in accordance with the limitations of our website and of course my deficient abilities. 🙂 It should be all down-the-falls sailing from there.

WAIT… WHY!?
If you haven’t read the discussions, many authors are complaining about Amazon banning reviews from anyone their algorithms decide knows the author. Offering authors a work-around could be our opportunity to provide a real service that incidentally increases Writers Co-op membership.

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About Writers, Amazon, book promotion, book sales, publishing, Stories, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

DECISION TIME

'One more time Huck, I'm gonna have to question your decision to bring the beaver.'

‘One more time Huck, I’m gonna have to question your decision to bring the beaver.’

ATTN: All Writers Co-op members (and potential members. 🙂 )

Two proposals have recently been discussed that deserve follow up.

Peer Review
The first is to add Peer Review page(s) of book reviews written by authors. Amazon tends to prevent or delete peer reviews. Writers Co-op could allow authors to post such reviews and link to the book’s sale page.
The argument for includes that it’d be a useful and easy service to offer, we’d just set up the page(s) and grant the authors’ permission to post there. The argument against includes the need to have a real person to manage and monitor those pages. Any volunteers?

Anthology
A Writers Co-op Anthology for 2018 has been mentioned and the feedback was positive. So, what do you think? Should we proceed towards publishing one? Who’s in? What themes would you want for the anthology? Do we even need a theme? We can publish a Writers Co-op Anthology if we cooperate in all aspects and contribute stories.

So speak up now!

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About Writers, Amazon, book promotion, book sales, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

Beating a Dead Horse

The previous post by Atthys Gage, detailing his experience using giveaways to promote book sales, makes it clear that giving away books is not the way to make money. Yet, authors continue to flail that dead horse.

Obviously, the “Top 100 Free in Kindle Store list” promotes Kindle and makes money for Amazon. That may be the ONLY reason Amazon offers it.
Where did we get this idea that free books promote book sales? (The only reason free Browser and free Search works for Google is that they make money off advertisements.)

Rooted deep in the author psyche is the need to be read. Most authors spend considerable portions of their life creating their books and feel rewarded when the book is read. Books are freely given to anyone who purports to fill that need. What’s wrong with this picture? What manufacturer do you know who gives away their products in the hope that they will be used? How many people have you met who are proud to work for free?

We can’t blame today’s publishers for stroking our egos by “choosing” our book to sell. Or blame retailers for accepting the books we freely give them to sell. That’s how they make money.

But we can demand that any publisher with his finger in our pie do the marketing. Otherwise, what the hell have they done to earn their profit? And, we can demand that retailers do more to prevent pirates from selling our books on the retailer’s website.

Writers need a Bill Of Writes.

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About Writers, blogging, Uncategorized, Welcome, Writers Co-op

Happy Holidays Again

Who’d of thunk we’d still be here, 20 months after beginning in April of 2016? Not only are we (quite vocally at times) here, I believe we have remained true to our original intent, as expressed by Curtis Bausse in the First Post.

What can you expect to find here? Since there’s nothing new under the sun, I do admit the innovation bit could be a challenge, but we’ll try our best, I promise. There’ll be anecdotes and analysis, thoughtfulness and humour, awards and recommendations, opinions, rants and wackiness. We don’t expect to work miracles and we don’t take ourselves too seriously. But what we do take seriously is writing itself. Which means we’re also keen to help writers explore whatever path might lead somewhere interesting, and help readers find good writing. If that sounds like a programme you could tune in to, you’ve come to the right place. Drop us a line, tell us what you’re up to. Maybe we’ll end up travelling the path together. Whichever one it turns out to be.
+++https://writercoop.wordpress.com/2016/04/26/here-we-are/

May Your God Bless You this holiday season and in the coming year.

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About Writers, Amazon, blogging, book reviews, book sales, Uncategorized, Writers Co-op

PEER REVIEWS

Amazon prevented me from reviewing books by Curtis Bausse and Victor Acquista because, they say, my review may be perceived as biased. Duh. I don’t know how they know but I do know they are wrong.
True, I only review books that are good. And yes, my reviews were positive but that’s because, as a writer myself, I know how difficult writing is and the good parts are always worth praising. Praising the best of a good book is not bias. It is acknowledgement.

So, I came up with half an idea.

If Facebook posts are any guide, many writers these days are pissed at Amazon’s review policies. What we need is a place where writers may post reviews of books. Peer reviews. Reviews by people who have read the story and can comment in depth because they have an appreciation for what it took to create that story.

Readers will not be mislead by reviews written by another writer if the fact’s disclosed:
– Review by Thomas Wolosz, Author of Agony of the Gods
Jeesh! It’s arrogant to believe that people can’t be trusted to think.

So, fellow writer co-opers, what say we create a place here, on the Writers Co-op, for writers to review books?
Call it, “Peer Reviews” and claim the high ground.
Many authors might appreciate it.
Authors will, of course, still want reviews on Amazon, but they would also link from their web page to their review in our Peer Reviews. It could make our site a bit more relevant to today’s writers.

As I said, it’s half an idea. The other half are the develish details.
What do you think and how might this work?

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About Writers, book reviews, Research, Uncategorized, world-building, Writers Co-op

A Question For Mimi

Mimi Speake is an historian of sixteenth century Europe & therabouts. She delves into the private lives of such as Bernard Délicieux, the Friar of Carcassonne and Henry of Navarre. Nothing seems to delight Mimi more than to accurately include in her stories obscure details about the financial information of a walled town from that period, or a seminal work on algebra, or even lore about La Fée Verte, the green fairy.
And uh, Mimi is the only historian I know. So, I have a question for her.

Is Google messing with history? Not on purpose. But is that repository of human knowledge fatally flawed because of what it does not include?

I ask because I recently searched for early reviews of Arthur C. Clarke’s first book, Against the Fall of Night, published by Startling Stories magazine in 1948. Despite the story itself being vintage Clarke, the novella was initially panned for its word dumps of the author’s social theories. They added nothing to the story. I know this because I read it as a kid and I still remember my eyes glassing over the pages of preaching.
A few years ago, I re-read it. The book that I re-read said it had been published only because fans had expressed interest in reading Clarke’s first novel. It’s forward discussed Against the Fall of Night’s initial reception (dismal) and included some of those early reviews (bad.)

But Google has unwittingly rewritten history. I cannot find any of those original reviews. The Fall of Night is today presented as if it hadn’t bombed; as if it is just another good book by Clarke, even though he had to rewrite it in 1956 as The City and the Stars.

I know. I know. Google is not a complete history of anything. It is only a collection of whatever bits people put on the ‘Net. (But I wonder how many people think about things that are not on the Internet.)

So, Mimi, if I may follow-up, how do you find information that is not on Google?

And for everyone, a broader question:
To what extent are search engine results and social media the background against which we frame our questions? Do they guide the answers that we accept?
In short, does the Internet shape our collective consciousness?

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